Sabrina the Teenage Witch Comic Miniseries Issues #1-5 Review

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Sabrina the Teenage Witch has been a staple show in American culture since the TV show premiered on ABC in the late 90’s, adapting the story from the ever popular Archie series of comics. Now we have a resurgence of this iconic series with the recent adaptation of The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina that premiered as both a comic series and Netflix TV show last year. Well, the series has been adapted again by Archie Comics into a less chilling mini-series, simply titled Sabrina the Teenage Witch. The miniseries runs 5 issues, or 1 volume, and winds up being a great companion to the more chilling series for those, like me, who prefer a less horror themed Sabrina. The last issue was released this past September, concluding the first arc of the series, but plans for a second mini-series have already been announced for 2020. If you’re a fan of the original Sabrina the Teenage Witch with all the teenage hijinks and snarky Salem come-backs, then I would highly suggest checking this out. 

This mini-series reboot follows Sabrina Spellman as she makes the move to Greendale to live with her two aunts. But adjusting to a new school and a new town has its challenges, especially for a teenager who can use magic. Not only does she have to deal with all those pesky teenage hormones and the bullies at her new school, but something seems to be transforming the teenagers of Greendale into monsters. After being forced to do battle with a Wendigo and a giant Kraken, Sabrina puts all of her magical knowledge to the test in order to figure out this mystery…in between kissing some cute boys of course.  Continue reading

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My Top Obsessions From This Month: September 2019

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Welcome to a new series for the blog: “My Top Obsessions from this Month” (title still under construction). This came about after some consideration on the nature of my blog and what I really want to talk about. I love having a blog specifically dedicated to Romance and all the anime, manga, and comics that fall under that genre, but there are times when I want to gush about other things. Well I figured I’d create this little space for myself to talk about some of the things I’ve fallen in love with on a monthly basis (to be published on the last day of every month), to give me the space to step away from the romance genre for a little bit and give everyone some more exposure to different things and myself the space to gush about various things on my mind. For this month I’ve included sections for manga/comics, books, TV shows/Movies, Podcasts, and youtube channels. Let me know in the comments if you also are obsessing over these things or have anything in particular that you’re currently obsessing over.  Continue reading

Five Ways to Improve Your Comic Reviews

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Have you ever wanted to get into comic reviewing or thought your reviews just needed a little extra something? I see a lot of reviews missing some key aspects those few times when I do actually read other people’s reviews. It’s been three years since I’ve started this blog and over the course of that time I’ve learned a lot about comics and the medium in general, but more importantly how to write about them. I’m in no way an expert, but I do have pretty strong opinions on what makes a good review and how we can better talk about and analyze comics as an artistic medium and an entertainment medium. Below are five tips to improve your comic reviews. Let me know in the comments if you have any other tips to add. Continue reading

Three WebToon Recommendations for Romance Fans

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No matter the platform, comics have always been a staple reading material for me since middle school, especially webcomics. I got drawn in at a fairly early age due to one of my cousins creating his own long-running web comic for pretty much as long as I’ve known him. Slowly that love of comics branched off into other areas, and I have to admit, I haven’t been reading them as much as I used to anymore. Maybe it’s because of life getting in the way or maybe it just due to the wide breadth of other reading material I’ve gotten drawn into recently including manga and a random assortment of prose novels. But once in awhile I like to go back and revisit webcomics, and I’m always reminded why I love them each time. There’s just so much creativity and new and interesting ideas that I think the very format of webcomics allows to flourish.

Which brings me to WebToons, something I only just recently downloaded on my phone and started digging through for new comics to read. Most of them I think are from Asian authors since it’s affiliated with LINE, an app not many people in North America use, but there are still the occasional comic created with a Western setting. Over the course of the last half year or so I’ve managed to find some great romance comics on the platform, a lot of them autobiographical, but there are still quite a lot of them that delve into fictional worlds. Below are three recommendations of good romance comics I found on WebToons. Continue reading

Taproot Paranormal Romance Comic Review

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It’s been awhile since I’ve done something other than an anime or manga review on this blog, so I think tonight I’d like to return to the world of comics, more specifically indie comics and graphic novels. Tonights review is a independent comic by Keezy Young called Taproot. I picked up this comic last October during a comic convention but never really got the chance to do more than read through it once. It’s such an adorable queer, paranormal romance that I couldn’t help getting drawn back to it this week and felt the urge to share it all with you.  Young combines her love of color, plants, queer relationships, and all things slightly creepy into a wholesome and lighthearted romance. Published by Lion Forge’s imprint Roar in 2017, the comic is apparently based off a webcomic (that I will need to check out later).

“A story about a gardner and a ghost” is how the subtitle for this comic reads, pointing to the basic premise of the story. On the back cover, the description expands: “Blue is having a hard time moving on. He’s in love with his best friend. He’s also dead. Luckily, Hamal can see ghosts, leaving Blue free to haunt him to his heart’s content. But something eerie is happening in town, leaving the local afterlife unsettled, and when Blue realizes Hama’s strange ability may be putting him in danger, Blue has to find a way to protect him, even if it means….leaving him.” Continue reading

Waxing Philosophical: What We Can Learn from even the Trashiest of Romances

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Valentine’s Day is behind us but I think it’s important to continue thinking about romance and the kind of impact these kinds of stories have on readers. It’s one of the reasons I created this blog and continue to return to romance series. Reading romance books and manga were majorly important to me when I was growing up. I started reading them back in middle school, or about 12 to 13 years old. I’ve never really thought about the significance of starting around that time until this article from Vulture pointed it out: the kinds of books you read in school are mostly stories of boys and men with the occasional dead girl so, in essence, romance books become a way to see girls and female characters in prominent roles. They’re thrilling, a way to experience and read about sex, something that is usually frowned upon in academia and some social circles. The US in particular isn’t very good about including comprehensive sex education in their schools, so for many girls, this is their first and sometimes only major way to learn about sex and sexual relationships.

The romance genre has gotten a bad rap over the years, considered “popular” literature or just not literature at all. Why? It could be because its an industry dominated by women who are writing predominantly for women. It could be the sometimes silly, “bodice-ripper” covers showing half naked women and men on full display. It could also be the escapist nature of romance fiction in general which tends to make people point at it and say, “there’s nothing good or intelligent you can get out of a story like that. It’s all just trash for bored housewives.” Which is completely and utterly wrong. Dismissing a whole genre in and of itself is wrong, and I’m here to tell you there are quite a few important life lessons you can learn from romance. Continue reading

Comics as Literature Part 2: Literary Graphic Novel Canon

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What would be your response if someone inexperienced with reading graphic novels and comics came up to you for advice on where to start? What kind of titles would you recommend? I bet I can name a few of the ones you just thought of. Maus, right? The Watchmen? It’s easy enough to pull these titles out of the many hundreds of thousands of different comic and graphic novels, not just because they’re so popular, but because over the years fans, creators, and academics alike have developed a fairly specific graphic novel literary canon. It’s become second nature to recommend these books to new fans of the medium, and I see the same titles come up again and again in message boards, from articles, and from classes at colleges trying to teach graphic novels as literature. It’s become sort of ironic to me in a way how many fans and creators, through the quest to be taken seriously as a literary medium, have created their own literary canon with the same few books recommended again and again. Continue reading

Waxing Philosophical: Current Opinions on Comics as Literature, Part 1

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by Michael Kupperman

Just this past week, the late and great Stan Lee passed away, one of the founders of the US comic book industry. He was and forever will be a cultural icon so many in the industry hold dear, and his passing reverberated across comics media and into the mainstream media. Unfortunately, the news reached the ears of Bill Maher, who responded to the passing of Stan Lee by criticizing comic books in a blog post. In it he says, “twenty years or so ago, something happened – adults decided they didn’t have to give up kid stuff. And so they pretended comic books were actually sophisticated literature.” He got a ton of backlash for the things he said, but his comments point back to a long-time struggle of comic artists and the industry: the struggle to be taken seriously. Something I had hoped was starting to seriously fizzle out, but apparently not. Continue reading

October Mythology Special: Gashadokuro, the Hungriest of Ghosts

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Japan is known for its hungry ghosts, yurei who come back to haunt those who have wronged them or come back to fulfill some unfulfilled purpose before they can move on. In the last post, we had the Manekute no Yurie or the beckoning hand that appears sticking out of empty rooms, and will only go away once its wants are fulfilled or someone reads it some sutras. However, the the Manekute no Yurei is a fairly benevolent ghost despite its hunger. Hunger can be an extremely powerful force especially when put into the perspective of starvation and famine, and that’s where tonight’s ghostly story comes from. The Gashadokuro is the hungriest ghost of all and one of the most dangerous of the yurei who walk the darkened streets of Japan. You definitely don’t want to meet this one, but if you do there’s only one thing you can do…..run. Continue reading

October Mythology Special: Jorogumo/Tsuchigumo and Indigenous History

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Japan Powered recounts one story about a curious thing that happened to a logger out in the forest: “One day a logger was going about his work. Since logging is an exhausting business, seeing as how this was Edo period Japan and the chainsaw hadn’t been invented yet, the man decides to take a short break. He hears the crash of a waterfall nearby, and decides that sitting on the stream bank and watching the waterfall would be a pleasant way to spend his lunch break. However, no sooner has the man settled himself and unpacked his food than a strange something attaches itself to his foot! Puzzled, the man pulls the sticky substance off. He sees that it is something like spider silk. He sticks the stuff to a nearby log. A moment later, the log goes zipping across the stream bank, only to disappear beneath the churning waters of the waterfall. Not a little spooked, our logger decides it’s best to take his lunch break elsewhere and he beats a hasty retreat back into the woods.” Continue reading